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Posts Tagged ‘Women's History Month’

Hillary Clinton made a major policy speech yesterday.  She’s running for president of the United States.  Every time she opens her mouth – and she has a pretty mouth that says smart things that some people sometimes dislike – somebody has something to say about how she sounds.  Seems it is never “just right.”

This popped up in my newsfeed which pretty concisely packages the issue.

03/23/2016 06:09 pm ET

I don’t know.  What does Hillary Clinton have to do to get it “just right?”  To  get anything just right? Personally, I was worried about how her poor voice would hold up, it had suffered such abuse these past weeks on the campaign trail.  It held up fine, and for my money her tenor was fine.  When Hillary gives policy speeches, she generally is calm and deliberate.  I have watched many over the past eight years since I began keeping track of her secretary of state tenure. That is her policy speech style.  I don’t even want to go into that.  Paige Lavender did the topic justice.  But what does Hillary have to do to get things “just right?”  More to the point, why does she have to?

Everybody has something to say about what she wears, how she sounds, how she looks.  Wear that yellow for the speech.  No!  Oh!  Not that awful yellow!  Be forceful!  Oh no!  Don’t yell.  Smile more!

Why can’t Hillary just be Hillary?  Why can’t the most qualified person ever to run in my life (Harry Truman began as a haberdasher – youngsters, just go google it –  I’m too tired – he was the first to run in my life) have a fair chance to spell out her plans without everybody talking about her tone, facial expression, and whatever other third element hits the windshield of the armchair quarterbacks.

When Hillary and I were in college, Marshall McLuhan (go look him up – I am tired of spoonfeeding voting age people) said the “medium is the message.”  He meant medium as print v. video.  So video is the message today, even though I still like to get my hands on transcripts and lift the passages I think are important. Video – and audio – are the whole show.

I know I am biased.  But WTF??????? What is so offensive about Hillary that Bernie’s foghorn and gesticulating, Ted’s cartoon voice, John’s bedtime story voice, and Trump’s bellowing (“Get ‘im out!”) fail to surpass in offensiveness, condescension, plain old annoyance?

Why is her wardrobe an issue?  They all look like a suit rack at the cleaners.  Why, when she puts forward the only sane. thought-out, and comprehensive plan to combat terrorism is anything other than her words and her plan an issue?

It really never entered my mind that we would have a woman president. I loved Shirley Chisholm.  She sat them all down like she was the detention teacher in the halls of Congress. Pat Schroeder gave it her best, and Gerri Ferraro made me proud coming within a margin of being a heartbeat away.  But this was never a goal.

It’s just that right now we have the best candidate I have ever seen.  She happens to be a woman with a message, a set of plans, and a way of explaining things. She’s not hard to look at, not hard to listen to, and, when you bother to listen, not hard to understand –  she explains well.

Why can’t Hillary get it just right?  Or is it that the chairs keep getting moved around while the music blares?

02-13-14-Y-02Why don’t the guys have to be pitch perfect?  Why don’t they even have to pitch it over home base, actually, as long as they throw?

Thank you Hillary Clinton for running for president when you didn’t have to.  Thank you for your plans, your brilliance, and for always being right on target while looking pretty and being your spunky and empathetic self. Your Homegirls love you!

 

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From December 1990 to September 1997, Mary Robinson was President of Ireland.  She was succeeded by Mary McAleese who served from November 1997 to November 2011.  An entire generation in Ireland grew up under women presidents. That is remarkable. Éirinn go Brách!

These bios are from Wikipedia,

By World Economic Forum from Cologny, Switzerland – Cropped from File:Mary Robinson World Economic Forum 2013 , original source The Moral Economy: From Social Contract to Social Covenant: Mary Robinson, CC BY-SA 2.0,

Mary Therese Winifred Robinson (née Bourke; Irish: Máire Bean Mhic Róibín;[3] born 21 May 1944 in Ballina, County Mayo) served as the seventh, and first female, President of Ireland from 1990 to 1997, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, from 1997 to 2002.

Read more >>>>

By Chancellery of the President of the Republic of Poland

Mary Patricia McAleese (/mækəˈls/; née Leneghan; Irish: Máire Pádraigín Mhic Ghiolla Íosa;[1] born 27 June 1951) served as the eighth President of Ireland from 1997 to 2011. She was the second female president and was first elected in 1997 succeeding Mary Robinson, making McAleese the world’s first woman to succeed another as president.[2] She was re-elected unopposed for a second term in office in 2004.[3] McAleese is the first President of Ireland to have come from either Northern Ireland or Ulster.[4]

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Other women presidents:  This website is celebrating five women presidents in honor of Women’s History Month and this Wikipedia page has an exhaustive list of female heads of state: List of elected and appointed female heads of state.

As for the United States, well … we’re not there … yet, but Hillary Clinton had a good week.  Mary Robinson was preceded in office by President Patrick Hillery. Maybe we will have the luck of the Irish!  May the wind be ever at her back!

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, is greeted by Ireland's President Mary McAleese and her husband Martin at Aras an Uachtarain in Dublin, Ireland as part of her five day tour of Europe Sunday Oct. 11, 2009. (AP Photo/Niall Carson/PA Wire) ** UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE **

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, is greeted by Ireland’s President Mary McAleese and her husband Martin at Aras an Uachtarain in Dublin, Ireland as part of her five day tour of Europe Sunday Oct. 11, 2009. (AP Photo/Niall Carson/PA Wire)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

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Olivia de Havilland was the most charming ingenue, as they were called in the 1930s.  She debuted as Hermia in Max Reinhardt’s film A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  It was 1935, the heydey of the film studios, and  the beginning of a long, and prolific career at Warner Brothers Studios.

Hattie McDaniel arrived in Hollywood in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929 and was never considered an ingenue.  The daughter of former slaves, most often she played a maid, but she was a talented performer and composer.

The paths of these two women crossed when both were cast in coveted roles in Gone With The Wind.

OK, well actually Olivia’s role, Melanie, was not that coveted – being in the movie was – but most white actresses of note at the time wanted to play Scarlett (including Olivia’s sister, Joan Fontaine).  Everyone who was anyone auditioned.  Olivia never wanted to play anyone but Melanie, a sympathetic yet colorless character compared to Scarlett.

The role Hattie netted, that of Mammy, was coveted enough for none other than Eleanor Roosevelt to have sent a letter of recommendation to producer David. O. Selznick for a friend, but Hattie got the part.  Mammy, beside Scarlett’s wild impulsive nature was the voice of reason.

Olivia’s skills transformed Melanie into a fierce mainstay for Scarlett in the movie despite Scarlett’s ambivalence at the surface. Scarlett’s other anchor was Mammy, her nurse from birth and her never silent conscience. Together they served as Scarlett’s support system.

Both received Oscar nominations as Best Supporting Actress in 1939 for their performances in the film.  Hattie McDaniel won.  She was the first Black actor to win an Academy Award.

Olivia made her own history later when she battled the studio system to throw off he shackles of studio contract restraints.  California Labor Code Section 2855, is still known today as the De Havilland Law.  She went on to win two Best Actress Oscars.

Hattie McDaniel died of breast cancer on October 26, 1952.  Olivia de Havilland resides in Paris and will be 100 years old on July 1, 2016.

Olivia de Havilland receiving the National Medal of Arts from President Bush, 2008

Helen Mirren, who should require no introduction, has said that women’s roles in movies will follow women’s roles in society. Hattie McDaniel has been the target of some undeserved criticism in the past for the roles she accepted to play.  She was an actor trying to make a living and accepted the best that was there at the time.

Both of these women made big marks on the film industry which  reflects and influences real life. Let’s honor them both for their contributions.

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Oh, man! Oh woman!  I have been so busy with Hillary’s campaign that I have been neglecting Women’s History Month!  Sorry!  It’s been a long day, a late night, and I needed a movie.  Gorillas in the Mist popped up!  Surely Dian Fossey was a hero of women’s history, a friend of peaceful species, and worthy of our notice this month.  You can be whatever you want to be.  Even a friend of a wild gorilla. I think Fay Wray would have liked her.

Dian Fossey

Dian Fossey
Dian Fossey Biography
Zoologist (1932–1985)

Name
Dian Fossey

Occupation
Zoologist

Birth Date
January 16, 1932

Death Date
December 26, 1985

Education
Darwin College, University of Cambridge, Lowell High School, San Jose State University

Place of Birth
San Francisco, California

Place of Death
Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

Synopsis
Early Life
‘Gorillas in the Mist’

Death and Legacy

Dian Fossey was a zoologist best known for researching the endangered gorillas of the Rwandan mountain forest from the 1960s to the ’80s, and for her mysterious murder.“It was their individuality combined with the shyness of their behavior that remained the most captivating impression of this first encounter with the greatest of the great apes.”—Dian Fossey

Synopsis

Dian Fossey was born on January 16, 1932, in San Francisco, California. While working as an occupational therapist, Fossey became interested in primates during a trip to Africa in 1963. She studied the endangered gorillas of the Rwandan mountain forest for two decades before her unsolved murder occurred in 1985, at Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda. Fossey told her story in the book Gorillas in the Mist (1983), which was later adapted for a film starring Sigourney Weaver.

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Dian was one of three, known as the “trimates,” chosen by Dr. Louis Leakey, to study the habits and cultures of primates on two continents.  Jane Goodall was selected to study chimpanzees. Birutė Galdikas was assigned the orangutans.  Sadly Dian did not survive. She was murdered by poachers, but her work carries on via her foundation.  Jane and Birutė carry on their important work via their foundations.

The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International >>>>

The Jane Goodall Institute >>>>

International Birutė Galdikas ecology charity and support foundation >>>>

You can also find Birutė on Facebook >>>>

 

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Dame Helen Mirren has chosen to portray some strong female characters,  among some of the real-life ones:

In the run-up to the glitz and glamor of Sunday’s Oscars, Dame Helen hosted the annual Women in Film reception celebrating women nominees and made her voice heard on the issue of the gender gap in the film industry.   This year, as far as we know, she dodged the red carpet and was all business.

If the montage shown at the Oscars to illustrate  this year’s theme of “Everyday Heroes” was any indication of the current representation of women in film,  Dame Helen’s focus on inequity is right on target.  Of the 21 clips shown (that I counted), only three were of real-life women heroes:  Norma Rae, Erin Brockovich, and “Maya,” the CIA operative in Zero Dark Thirty.   That is fewer than 15% and deplorable!  Karen Silkwood, Anne Frank, Joan of ArcVeronica Guerin, the Mirabal sisters the machinists of Dagenham, and Barbara Castle were nowhere to be seen in that montage.  The Academy and the industry can and must do much better.

That this comes as we begin Women’s History Month is both appropriate and ironic.

Thank you, Dame Helen!

Helen Mirren Takes on the Gender Gap

Lupita Nyong'o and Helen Mirren at the Women in Film event.Getty Images Lupita Nyong’o and Helen Mirren at the Women in Film event.

WEST HOLLYWOOD –

“Shut up,” said Helen Mirren, “’cause Mama’s in the house.”

“That includes all you guys over there near the bar,” she added, as she waited for the crowd to quiet down at the Women in Film reception on Friday evening. The boys did as the Dame commanded.

Ms. Mirren was out and about on the party circuit on Friday – she’d also made a brief appearance at the British film reception beforehand – and was this year’s co-host of the annual event, held at Fig & Olive restaurant. It spotlights female Oscar nominees – each wears a fragrant white gardenia corsage – and also serves as a booster moment to reverse the continued gender disparity in the industry.

Read more >>>>

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Congratulations to Jennifer Lee on being named Global Ambassador for the Global Media Monitoring Project!  Here are some updates about her and her work.

Women’s History Month Screenings in Public Libraries
Global Ambassador for Global Media Monitoring Project

March is Women’s History Month and “Feminist: Stories from Women’s Liberation” will be screening for free in March in public libraries around the country. This is part of the Women’s History Month initiative.
I just returned from a great screening at the University at Buffalo. The screening was hosted by The Society of Feminists.
Additionally, I have been appointed one of four Global Ambassadors for the Global Media Monitoring Project. The GMMP is the longest longitudinal study of women in the media globally. Every five years the GMMP have monitors around the world who watch the news and report on the representation of women in news stories and as anchors and reporters. I will talk about the information in my presentations of “Feminist: Stories from Women’s Liberation.”

Have a great Women’s History Month!

Kind regards,
Jennifer

Monitoring media around the world means “you are getting a reaction from a person not in the media bubble and getting a perspective we don’t normally get,” Lee noted.” 
GMMP Ambassador: feminist filmmaker Jennifer Lee by Solange De Santis February 24, 2014 

The 2014 Global Ambassadors for the Global Media Monitoring Project!


“The GMMP, which has been held every five years since 1995, monitors the representation of women in global media. So far, the monitoring shows extremely slow progress in bringing women’s voices to bear in public discourse taking place through the news media. Not only does the news present a male-centric view of the world, it is also marked by gender bias and extensive stereotyping that underpin marginalization, discrimination and violence against girls and women.” 
GMMP to have Ambassadors

“Feminist Stories” is poignant, funny, very powerful, and unapologetic.”
Charles Clymer, Huffington Post Blogger
Celebrate Women’s History Month!
Click here for the schedule with directions to the libraries

The Women’s History Month Screening schedule
March 1 at 2:00 pm South Madison Branch Library, South Madison, Wisconsin Calendar of Library Events
March 1 at 3:00 pm Berkeley Public Library, Berkeley, CA Q+A with Jennifer Lee Calendar of Library Events
March 2 at 2:00 pm 
Klamath County Library, Klamath Falls, Oregon Facebook page
March 3 at 4:30pm Hereford Branch Library Hereford, Maryland
March 3 at 6:45 pm Durango Public Library, Durango, Colorado Calendar of Library Events
March 4 at 6:00 pm Rockwell Branch Library, Wichita, Kansas
March 8 in Flagstaff, Arizona Time and venue TBD Q+A with Jennifer Lee
March 9 at 7:30 pm Little Art Theater, Yellow Springs, Ohio Facebook page
March 11 at 2:00 pm Albany Public Library, Albany, New York Library Calendar of Events
March 12 at 6:00 pm Molokai Branch Library, Molokai, Hawaii
March 12 at 6:30 pm La Canada Flintridge Public LIbrary, La Canada Flintridge, California Q+A with Jennifer Lee Library Facebook Page
March 14 at 3:30 pm John F. German Public Library, Tampa Florida
March 15 at 4:00 pm Kansas Public Library, Kansas, Oklahoma Library Facebook Page
March 16 at 2:00 pm Los Angeles Central Library, Los Angeles, California Q+A with Jennifer Lee
March 17 at 5:00 pm New Orleans Public LIbrary, New Orleans, Louisiana
March 19 at 6:00 pm CU Boulder, UMC 457 Dennis Small Cultural Center
March 19 at 6:00 pm Igo Branch LIbrary, San Antonio, Texas
March 21 at 6:00 pm Pico House in El Pueblo in downtown Los Angeles. Pico House is at El Pueblo
March 22 at 2:00 pm Allendale Branch Library, Pasadena, California Jennifer Lee will participate in a Q +A with authors Ellen Snortland and Lois Banner
March 22 at 2:00 pm Bessie Coleman Branch, Chicago, Illinois
March 22 at 3:00 pm New Haven Public Library, New Haven, Connecticut Library
March 24 at 1:00 pm Rapid City Public Library, Rapid City, South Dakota Library Calendar of Events
March 24 at 6:30 pm Duluth Public LIbrary, Duluth Minnesota Library Facebook Page
March 26 at 7:00 pm Alicia Ashman Branch Library, Madison, Wisconsin Library Calendar of Events
March 23 time TBD Rapid City Public Library in Rapid City, South Dakota
March 27 at 5:30 pm at 
Hulbert Public Library, Hulbert, Oklahoma
March 27 2014 Boston University, Women’s Liberation Conference, Panel Discussion, “A Revolutionary Moment,” 7:30 PM Q+A with Jennifer Lee

There is always room for more screenings. Just let me know! jennifer@feministstories.com

Radio Interview
I will participate in the WBAI fundraiser on March 5 from 8-10 EST. 20 DVDs of “Feminist: Stories from Women’s Liberation” will be offered as part of their promotional items. Fran Luck is the executive producer of Joy of Resistance: Multi-Cultural Feminist Radio

Recent blog postings

My piece in The Broad Side: “Library Activism and Women’s History Month” Read about the importance of libraries during Women’s History Month.

A portion of a historical timeline in a public library. What is missing? 🙂

Purchase a DVD
Your school or organization can buy a DVD of “Feminist:Stories From Women’s Liberation.” Currently there are many universities, public schools, beauty schools, middle schools, non-profits, and libraries acquiring their own copies to show to students and members.
http://www.feministstories.com/pre-order-feminist-stories-form

Book a screening
Have Jennifer Lee attend your school for a Q+A. Email her: jennifer@feministstories.com
The official Website http://www.feministstories.com
 

 

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OH!  This is one of those moments when I so wish I could have been in that crowd. This is a great read!   Everyone knows who Chelsea and Sandra are. New Yorkers know Christine well.  She’s the one with the auburn hair who stands just behind Michael Bloomberg’s shoulder in every shot she can get into and is probably going to be the next mayor.  Nicolle Wallace?  What can I say?  Anyone who worked as hard as she did to try to get Sarah Palin to understand campaign tactics and foreign policy (or even history and geography) gets an A+ in my book!  Wish I had been there.  Fun read.  HRC  looms large,  Rosenblum notes.

10:27 am Mar. 29, 2012

It’s been more than 30 years since women began to vote in greater numbers than men in presidential elections, and four since Hillary Clinton almost became the Democratic nominee for president. 

But of course Hillary didn’t make it, and it’s going to be at least another four years before a woman is nominated by either of the major parties.

“We’re either not having the right conversation,” moderator Chelsea Clinton told the seven-woman panel and a full audience last night at the 92nd Street Y, “or we’re not being heard loudly enough, whether we’re running in heels, or flats or boots.”

READ MORE>>>> (YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO!!!!)

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