Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘The War on Women’

I ran across this graphic on Facebook yesterday.

Yep, ma’am.  You can bring your gun in, but not those maxi-pads!

There has been a great deal of news coverage the past week of the Zimmerman trial, and , to some extent, that has reduced the degree to which this story has been covered.  Here is a report, published by Jessica Luther,  from the Texas Senate Gallery.  Just thought you should know.

aptopix-abortion-restrictions-texas

My friend, Nancy Flores, is in the gallery for the Senate debate on HB2 and is updating her personal Facebook page. And it’s wonderful. So, with her permission, I’m going to post her FB posts here:

(started around 2pm…all words after this are Nancy’s):

Read Nancy’s account >>>>

Read Full Post »

As a little girl, I liked to play with caterpillars.  I did so very gently because they were so delicate, pretty, and harmless.  Caterpillars neither bite nor sting.  Sometimes I would put one in a jar with leaves and branches and airholes in the lid hoping, eventually, to have my own butterfly.  My mother always convinced me, at the end of the day, to free the little creature into the wild where it belonged.

My next-door neighbor, Johnny, liked to squash caterpillars or decapitate them.   I think the more horrified I was by his actions, the more fun he had doing terrible things to tiny, harmless, helpless creatures.

In denial that there is a Republican War on Women, RNC chair Reince Priebus likened that claim to “a war on caterpillars.”  What an interesting allusion!   What we women are calling “the war on women” is rooted in various stances taken by  Republican candidates for president this primary season, candidates  who would ban Planned Parenthood from public funding  and oust women from the workplace,  in tandem with actions in the Republican Congress that would limit women’s access to health care.

These extreme anti-female actions and commentaries have been compared to attitudes held by the Taliban.  Looking at the life-cycle of the lowly little caterpillar, we see some validity in the metaphor.

Eventually, the fuzzy little caterpillar winds around herself a silken shell of her own weaving, the pupa stage,  wherein she wears something akin to a burka and hangs out on a branch – forbidden to circulate in public, as it were.

Science Dictionary
pupa  (py ‘pə) Pronunciation Key
(click for larger image in new window) Plural pupae  (py ‘pē)
An insect in the nonfeeding stage of development between the larva and adult, during which it typically undergoes a complete transformation within a protective cocoon or hardened case. Only certain kinds of insects, such as moths, butterflies, ants, and beetles, develop as larvae and pupae. Compare imago, larva, nymph.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source

Ultimately, the lovely, and equally delicate butterfly developing inside, breaks out of her shell and flutters away – but wait not in the Taliban world.  Only in the privacy of her husband’s presence may the woman free herself of the confinement of the burka.  He rules everything about her life in much the same way the Republican men (yes, I will be specific here since Olympia Snowe  has announced the end of her congressional career in opposition) appear to want to control the lives of women from their health care options through their right to work outside the home.

Using  either an unfortunate or purposeful metaphor,  Priebus cast women into a Kafkaesque role with his remarks.  Last night I went to bed as a woman.  I woke up this morning a larva.   Is there any lower echelon to which women may be assigned?

Read Full Post »