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Posts Tagged ‘misogyny’

Man!  Or anyway THIS man!  Right on the heels of all the cute body language stuff in the previous post, this comes up on one of the news feeds,  and I am amazed since heretofore Dennis Miller has been pretty positive about our Head Homegirl.

Speaking with Palin, Dennis Miller transitions from calling Newsweek cover ’sexist’ to insulting Hillary Clinton.
Earlier this week, Sarah Palin wrote on her Facebook page that Newsweek’s choice to use a Runner’s World photo of her in running shorts for its cover was “unfortunate” and “sexist.” Palin’s criticism has since been echoed on both the left and right. Interviewing Palin on his radio show yesterday, Dennis Miller added his voice to those calling the cover “sexist.” But he then did something that most of the other critics haven’t done. He immediately followed it with a joke about Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that could also be easily characterized as sexist:

MILLER: Listen, Sarah, I have to ask you. This Newsweek cover. First off, I have two thoughts on this. To me it seems blatantly sexist and secondly I’m just glad they didn’t decide to do it with Hillary during the primaries. But your thoughts on it. You a little POed at this? I mean this was for another magazine, right?

Well, it is sexist, Dennis,  and now you are on my list that includes Bill Maher, Dana Carvey, and Robin Williams, for making  nasty comments or innuendo about our Homegirl’s appearance. Actually, Dennis and cohorts, physical features and their appeal are very much a matter of taste. I, for one, just do not think Sarah Palin is all that attractive, although it seems a lot of guys think she’s hot on that Newsweek cover.

I have, but will not post, two very hot pictures of Hillary Clinton wearing less than what Sarah is on that cover – in a bathing suit – and she is very beautiful. She has a very curvy figure, a tiny waist, nice bust and hips, and yes, pretty legs and looks smashing – very feminine. So, Dennis, I do not know what you mean.

I am really sick of men who think they are so hot (and are not) making remarks about women’s physical appearance. This goes for you, Dick Morris, and for you too, Lame Cherry, too cowardly to come out from behind your screen name making negative comments about Michelle Obama’s appearance.

These women (all women) have their own personal styles. The cover picture on Newsweek (I will not give them the satisfaction of a link) was an inappropriate choice, and I believe Mrs. Palin (she is not Governor of anything anymore) should have been allowed input as to what picture went on the cover.

But, reality check, Dennis and the rest of you: You and your “parts” (that includes the parts between your ears) are none too attractive to me! You are not going to make headway with women by speaking with forked tongues – by petting Sarah then slamming Hillary. I am boycotting the appearances of all these guys on my list and invite my Sistah Homegirls to do he same. The portrayals by all of them of Hillary were shameful. Shameful!

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This is a must read/must see!


I want to call special attention to this speech. It brought me to tears. Those who missed what Hillary was doing in Africa should read this speech.
If you have never known what is at the heart of Hillary’s drive, this is it, and here she explains why. So for those who occupy themselves with gossip, with preoccupations about her wardrobe and her looks (both of which I find lovely), with her level of happiness in her new job (very happy), and the level of respect she gets from the White House (seems high to me), here is a speech that crystallizes the essence of Hillary Clinton. This is what she is about.
Event hosted by the Government of the Netherlands
New York City, NY
September 25, 2009

I want to start by saying something that I believe with all my heart, and, obviously, those of you who are here believe it also, that the issues related to girls and women are not an annex to the important business of the world and the United Nations, they’re not an add-on, they’re not an afterthought; they are truly at the core of what we are attempting to do under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that is the guiding message of this organization and what each of us in our own countries is called to do on behalf of equal opportunity and social justice.
So for me, this is a tremendous opportunity to speak about an issue that has basically been relegated to the backwaters of the international agenda until relatively recently: violence against girls and women, and particularly today, violence against girls.
I wish that we could transport ourselves into a setting where we could be in the midst of girls and women who have been suffering from violence, but we don’t have to because it’s all around us. It is in the home, it is in the workplace, it is on the streets of many of the countries represented here, including my friends Maxine and Celso. And it is in the places that make the headlines from time to time, and then in the very bottom paragraphs, there’s a reference to the violence that is a tactic of war and intimidation and oppression to prevent girls from going to school by throwing acid in their faces, by raping girls as a way of intimidating them and keeping them subjugated and demonstrating power.
So this, for me, is one of the most important events that I’ve done at the UN. I worked this week with President Obama on our agenda, on everything from nonproliferation and the threats posed by Iran to the P-5+1, to the ongoing challenge of the Middle East, and so much else. But oftentimes, my press – I’ll only speak for the American press – will pose a question that goes something like this: “Why are you spending so much time on these issues that are less important or not as significant as the ones that are really at the heart of foreign policy?”
And I usually patiently explain, for about the millionth time, that this is the heart of foreign policy. Because after all, what are we doing? We’re trying to improve the lives of the people that we represent and the people who share this planet with us. And we do it through diplomacy, and we do it through development, and occasionally we have to do it through defense. But violence against any one of our fellow beings is intolerable. And when it is part of the cultural fabric of too many societies, when it is an assumption of the way things are supposed to be, then it is absolutely a cause for our action collectively.
As some of you know, I traveled to Goma in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo last month. I went to a refugee camp that is home to 18,000 people in a very small plot of land; in fact, land that is covered by lava from a volcanic eruption. And it was a stark reminder of a conflict that has left 5.4 million people dead since 1998. And walking through that refugee camp was, as I’ve often felt walking through camps in other places, both the best and the worst of humanity: the worst because of what drove these people to this extreme measure of fleeing their homes, leaving their fields, running from danger; and the best because of the international response.
But the people leading me through the camp – they had a man who was the president, a woman who was the vice president – were talking about what life was like day to day, because the camp provides no security. You are there, but if you venture out, as too many of the girls told me, for water or firewood, or literally just to breathe because you’re living arm-to-arm with thousands of other people, you put your life at risk. Something like 1,100 rapes are reported each month in the Eastern Congo; that’s an average of 36 women and girls raped every day.
I heard a lot of terrible stories. A 15-year-old girl who looked younger than her years, who was fetching water from the river, when two soldiers – she wasn’t sure who they were, were they irregulars, were they militias, were they the Congolese army. They were just soldiers who told her if she refused to give in to them they would kill her. They beat her, ripped her clothes off, and raped her.
I met one of the nine-year-old girls who was nabbed by two soldiers, who put a bag over her head, and raped her repeatedly in the bushes; and a woman who was eight months pregnant when she was attacked, and after being so brutalized and losing her baby, she was no longer accepted in her own home.
And then I met a woman who was about my age, who had four children and a husband. They were farmers from one of the small holding farms that so many of the world’s poor try to survive by. And she called them bandits. They took her husband out, shot him. Two of her children ran out to try to help their father, shot them, came into the house, shot the other two children all in front of her, and then repeatedly gang-raped her, left her for dead. And she told me she wished that she had died.
Well, these are the most extreme examples, but there are so many that we could point to. And since I believe that the progress of girls and women holds the key to sustainable prosperity and stability in the 21st century, this is a matter of great concern to me and to my country. When women are accorded their rights and accorded equal opportunities in education and healthcare and employment and political participation, they invest in their families, they lift them up, they contribute to their communities and their nations. When they are marginalized, when they are mistreated, when they are ignored, when they are demeaned, then progress is not possible, no matter how rich and well-educated the elite may appear.
The problem of violence against women and girls is particularly acute in conflict zones, but that’s not the only place we find it. The UN has done some excellent work in the last years in war-torn areas. And while boys are pressed into service as child soldiers and trained to kill, and often drugged to do so, girls are raped and often forced into becoming sex slaves. And this has happened to thousands and thousands of children. We also know that despite the best efforts of those of us in this room, all too often these acts of brutality and de-humanity do not just affect the individuals, they affect the fabric that weaves us together as human beings.
Next week, I will chair a Security Council session here in New York on the epidemic of sexual violence against women and girls in conflict zones. And the United States will introduce a resolution to strengthen our efforts to curb these atrocities and hold all those who commit them accountable. We will call for a special representative of the Secretary General to lead, coordinate, and advocate for efforts to end sexual and gender-based violence in armed conflict.
But violence against women and girls happens everywhere. You have not only domestic violence, but female feticide, dowry-related murder, trafficking in women and girls. It’s quite alarming that even among well-educated people in some countries, the rate of selective abortion against girls is alarming. There are millions – some estimate as many as 100 million – missing girls. And they are missing because they’re either aborted or they are still subjected to infanticide or they are denied nutrition and healthcare and allowed to die in alarming numbers before the age of five.
In Thailand in the 1990s, I met girls who’d been sold into prostitution by their fathers, when they were as young as eight. And by the time they were 12, many of them were dying of AIDS. I drove around the area in northern Thailand, and one of the people with me said, “You can tell which homes have sold their girls, because they’re the ones with the satellites” and that there’s a lot of peer pressure; it would go satellite, satellite, then you’d have no satellites, and then satellite, satellite.
So we know these statistics. A third of all women will face gender-based violence at some point in their lifetime. In some parts of the world, the number is as high as 70 percent. The United Nations estimates that at least 5,000 so-called honor killings take place each year. Nearly 50 percent of all sexual assaults worldwide are against girls aged 15 or younger. And more than 130 million girls and young women have been subject to genital mutilation.
All over the world, you find a higher value on male children, girls being coerced into early marriages, denied access to schools, adequate nutrition and healthcare, and enslaved in forced labor. And so there are many stories. We have two young women with us today, and we have many more who they represent.
The problem is that very often there is no legal action taken against those who perpetuate this violence, even when they are members of a nation-state’s armed forces. We are pressing the government of the DRC very hard to bring to justice five officers of the military who have been implicated in either these actions themselves or in a permissive environment for them.
And there are many young women who are standing up and who need our support. The story of Mukhtar Mai, a young woman who I’ve come to know, who was gang-raped in 2002 on the orders of her tribal council in rural Pakistan because of something her brother had done. She was forced to walk home naked in front her village, and she was expected to kill herself. I mean, that’s what you do. You get humiliated, you get shamed, you get attacked. It’s your fault, you go kill yourself. And the crime, the best we could determine, was her brother was seen walking with a girl from an upper caste village.
So what happened to her? She refused to kill herself, and she refused to hide, and she refused to give in to the cultural milieu in which this attack had taken place. And her case became something of an international cause. And people began asking: What can we do for her? They donated money. She built the first school in her village. She herself enrolled in that school. And now, because of the money that has come in since she was courageous enough to speak out, the school has an ambulance service, a school bus, a woman’s shelter, a legal clinic, and a telephone hotline.
Now, she’s a remarkable young woman, but she’s not alone. And what we need to do is support those who are standing up. I have a friend here, Molly Melching, whom I first met and worked with more than 10 years ago in Senegal, where she very deliberatively began to build community rejection of female genital mutilation by going from village to village and making it a health issue, making it an issue that the tribal elders and the imams began to recognize was not in keeping with their views of themselves or of Islam. And this is possible. It takes time, and we can’t, can’t give up.
So let me just end with a call to action from the leaders of many religious faiths who came together last year to advocate for an end to violence against women, and here’s what they said: Each of our faith traditions speaks to the fundamental value of all human life. Violence against women denies them their God-given dignity. We cannot afford to remain silent when so many of our women and girls suffer the brutality of violence with impunity.
So this meeting could not be more timely or important. Now, we’ve got to follow up. And hopefully, in UNGAs to come, we will fill larger and larger rooms. We will have people making commitments. I know the Dutch Government is very intent upon trying to make sure that action follows. And we can work with our friends not only from Brazil, but I see many of my other colleagues here today. And I hope that we will be the voices for those women who will never appear before the Security Council, they will never leave Goma, they will never leave rural Pakistan, they will never leave their village in Latin America or anywhere else, to come and plead their case before us. So it falls to us to make sure their voices are heard.
Thank you very much.

Cross-posted at A Rose For Hillary and Still4Hill

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The recent implosion of websites, forums, and groups that bear Hillary’s name, originally supported her candidacy and agenda, organized as a result of her campaign, and/or followed her progress as Secretary of State has occurred in such a way as to appear, even to the casual observer, coordinated. As a former resident of the now defunct Hillary’s Village, I am familiar with how that particular forum went down. Weeks later, having read the stories in emails, on Facebook, on blogs, I have seen that other sites experienced similar difficulties or transformations. Here’s what happened at Hillary’s Village and why I think it continues to be important for true Hillary loyalists to guard against influences that come from quarters that hold none of Hillary’s values, principles, or plans.

At HV there probably always was a strong, powerful Republican presence. I will say it here: I suspect administrators (perhaps not all) and super mods (some) were dyed in the wool Republicans. The Village might even have been started by Republicans for all I know. As a former mod there myself, I can say that there was special attention paid to infiltration by and banning of Obots. No equivalent attention was paid to Republicans or neo-cons.

Sarah Palin announced her resignation on July 3, a Friday. I was asked that day by a BTR radio host to call in with my reaction during that evening’s show. When I did, I gave my opinion as a voter. I said that this does nothing to inspire in a voter faith that she would ever again fulfill a term in public office. I called her a quitter,  and I was royally attacked in the chat room. I invited those folks to call in and refute what I had said. None did.

The following Sunday I went to HV, clicked on “new posts” and was amazed to see a long string of threads about Sarah Palin and NOTHING ABOUT HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, the Village chief! When this phenomenon persisted through the day of July 5, I went back over there and cross-posted something from this blog wherein I had also referred to Palin as a quitter. Again I was attacked. Further, I could see in other threads that there was pressure being exerted on Villagers to support Palin. (It was not made clear how exactly one supports someone who is leaving office and has not declared candidacy for any other). Essentially the message was : If you supported Hillary, you MUST support Sarah.

Now I will defend women of any political stripe against sexist attacks, and I had defended Palin there and on my own blogs. I draw the line, though, at crossing political philosophies just because a politician is a woman. Maggie Thatcher was never my girl. Sarah Palin is not.

I stepped back from HV that day. I reentered occasionally to check, but the Palin threads were overwhelming. A week later there was an odd and disturbing message sent to some Villagers from a known source directing us to a different forum where screen-shots of private chats from HV had been posted. The remarks indicated some personal conflicts had arisen in the high administration, but there were also clear labels – political ones – attached to administrators and super mods. I decided to remain away from HV until the dust settled. Within days it was gone.

Prior to that, Together4Us had sustained attacks so terrible, it seems, that posting there has become more tedious than watching paint dry. Pantsuit Politics had some kind of trouble. Since then odd things have occurred at Hillbuzz – in fact it apparently is now a Sarah Palin site.

Many sites originally associated with Hillary and named for her now boast testimonials to Palin, and members are exposed to Palin propaganda. This indicates Republican infiltration and extends as well to “feminist” sites that claim to be non-partisan. I view it as typical bait-and-switch. You do a search, think you have found a Hillary site, link in and find a Sarah site.

I lay the death (as well as the birth) of HV squarely on the shoulders of Republicans and neo-cons who disguised themselves as PUMAs and Ultra-Militant Feminists who pretended that discussing anything other than Hillary’s policies and deeds was sexist. We were told more than once, no matter what challenge Hillary faced that this woman-of-steel could weather anything so -NO SYMPATHY, PLEASE! Even when she broke her elbow, I saw: “She’ll be back tomorrow.” (Well, essentially, she WAS, but she should not have been). No sympathy for the pain! We were told it was sexist to talk about her wardrobe, hair, looks. Now I know that these were foxes in the henhouse trying to intimidate Hillary’s loyalists and push them toward the Republican party using Palin as their tool.

Unfortunately, over the past year I have seen former Democrats become Republicans – manipulated by Republicans, not simply on the Palin issue, but also by using scare tactics re: things the Obama administration will do. Well, I am no fan of that administration, but some of what I am seeing makes no sense. Just one: Flu vaccine will be mandatory and you will be forced to get it. Hello? There is not even ENOUGH vaccine!

I bring all of this up in the run-up to the appearance in tomorrow’s New York Times of an interview with Hillary wherein she makes her agenda for women very clear along with her reasons for doing so: A New Gender Agenda. When I read what Hillary has to say, I see nothing that I have not always known about her since she surfaced on my periscope. But there is a resounding LACK of attention to these issues mounted by Palin supporters and by Pailn herself.

Hillary explains the relationship between the political, social, and economic well-being of women and a healthy and free society. I have never heard any of these notes sung by Palin, have you? If you are a woman, staying with Hillary and her objectives is the only option that makes any sense. If you are a man, and you read her words, you will see that supporting her goals makes the most sense for any society. If you are a Palin supporter, you should read this. If you were a Hillary supporter and now support Palin, what on earth are you thinking?

Read the interview.

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Muzzammil Hassan has been charged with murder in the death of his wife, Aasiya Hassan.

On my birthday, February 12, two events shocked Buffalo, New York. One was immediately broadcast over Cable TV and the internet. I was in a chat room when the commuter jet crashed into a suburban home. While we chatted and exchanged information, my friends found and posted photos and even You Tube videos that were posted within minutes of having been taken.

The other story took days longer to bleed out into the mainstream media. I watched and counted. The plane crash occurred late on a Thursday night. The other story did not begin to appear in mainstream broadcasting for four days. Tuesday, February 17, was the first time I heard that story reported on network and cable TV news.

The second story concerns Muzzammil Hassan who founded an upstate New York TV station expressly for the purpose of countering stereotypes about Muslims. It seems Mr. Hassan murdered and beheaded his wife who had filed for divorce. We are not certain of the sequence of events. It is possible that Aasiya Hassan, stabbed multiple times with a hunting knife, was still alive when beheaded. Mr. Hassan has been charged with second degree murder. Yes, you read that correctly. The CNN account is here.

The previous day, Wednesday February 11, in Flushing, Queens, also in NY, Afghan diplomat Mohammed Fagirad, holding his 22-year-old wife prisoner in their home, beat her mercilessly, “like a dog” (his words) for 15 hours. This NY Daily News account appeared on Valentine’s Day.

Later the following week, while driving home, I heard a report of a man (also with an Arabic name) in Bergen County*, NJ where I work, who used an online bulletin board to advertise for someone to beat up and disfigure his wife so that no one else would want her. I was unable to find a written account of the story. The man unwittingly paid an undercover officer,  who responded to the ad,  and was promptly arrested.

These three cases, coming so close together, put me on alert. We have heard the stories coming out of the UK. I even saw Geert Wilders on American TV late last week speaking of being prevented from entering the UK due to his opposition to Shariah Law.

With cases like these arising, chances increase for leaders in the Islamic community to call for the establishment of Shariah family courts to replace our local and federal courts within Islamic enclaves. There is no way that this would be acceptable.

The laws that we live by, our local town and city charters, our state constitutions, and the Constitution of the United States are the laws that apply to all who live within our various jurisdictions. For the rule of law to succeed, the law must apply equally and fairly to all. To apply a different set of laws to a special, internal community is to threaten the fabric and cohesion of the culture. It violates the social contract and cannot help but have a destructive effect on society.

We do not have to imagine or speculate since both the Netherlands, where Wilders is an MP, and the UK, which refused his entry, stand out as European cultures of Judeo-Christian tradition that have permitted Shariah family courts to handle special cases. Those special cases would include extreme forms of discipline against wives and female children. I, personally, have not heard of a man brought into family court by a wife or daughter. If you have , please enlighten me.

In her confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, our Secretary of State, Hillary Rodham Clinton, in an exchange with Senator Barbara Boxer, discussed attacks on girls and women in Muslim countries. She put the period on the sentence when she said, “This is not culture, this is not custom, this is criminal.”

That, for me, is the slogan and the rallying cry for this country to stand strong against any preemptive attempt to establish laws and courts other than our own sovereign CIVIL system within our jurisdictions.

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*Yes, Bergen County is also where Betty Jean Kling’s daughters were when Louisa was shot.

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I should have posted this days ago. I woke up to this news the morning after it happened in a neighboring town. I had no idea that her mother was someone I knew from the blogs and Blog Talk Radio. This is cross-posted from Freemenow.

Louisa Rodas, the daughter of outspoken women’s rights advocate Betty Jean Kling was shot in the head the evening of December 15th, 2008 as reported HERE and HERE and HERE. In Betty Jean’s Blogspot, Freemenow, she writes: “She has less than a 50/50 chance of surviving and if she does, she will have one eye, one ear, a half of a head and be paralyzed on one side-we have no idea how much brain damage.”

Betty Jean’s daughters Denise & Louisa

What does Betty ask for in the wake of this tragedy? In addition to prayers for her  daughters:

*Spread this story far and wide, along with the pictures. This MUST STOP! No more Domestic Violence.

*Zero tolerance for sexism and disrespecting females in any way, shape or form. Never again laughing at women’s expense.

*March, Advocate and Demand stricter laws.

Betty Jean is asking for our help, to keep making our voices heard, to march, to advocate, to demand laws that protect women. Perhaps, to advocate for a “Louisa’s Law”, to keep Domestic Violence predators from being granted the ability to continue to stalk their victims due to our sexist, antiquated and inadequate legal system.

The relentless sexism and misogyny in America is killing our mothers, daughters and sisters every single day. How does domestic violence against women start? With the very sexism that is so common and acceptable in our country. The pattern is predictable and repeated thousands of times daily across our land where some are more “free” than others.

The abuser begins by making fun of or ridiculing the woman. He belittles her with so-called “jokes” and name calling.  He calls her names like “bitch” or “whore” or “cunt”. He then escalates to invading her personal space. He feels it is perfectly OK to grab, grope and touch her intimately and without her consent. She is treated like an object and her objections are treated as a joke or worse, an infringement of his “rights” to amuse himself. Eventually, his disrespect for her boundaries, his contempt and feeling of entitlement to use and control her leads to ever-escalating abuse. And violence.

The American Institute of Domestic Violence reports:

A National Epidemic

  • Women are 85-95% of all domestic violence victims.
  • Men stalk over 500,000 of their intimate partners each year.
  • Men abuse 5.3 million women each year.
  • Men kill 1,232 women each year; their intimate partners.
  • Male-perpetrated domestic violence is the #1 leading cause of injury to women.
  • Women are more likely to be attacked by someone they know rather than by a stranger.
  • The leading cause of death for women is the workplace homicide by a male intimate.

In recent days, Betty Jean has demanded the firing of the now infamous gropergate poster icon Jon Favreau, Barack Obama’s speechwriter. He was photographed with a cardboard cut-out of Senator Hillary Clinton at a party. Favreau, described as a “normal guy having a good time” and a “great talent” and another fellow were on each side of the mocked up version of Hillary. One forced beer down her throat while Favreau squeezed her breast. They were laughing. It was a joke. One that was so funny, they publicized it on Favreau’s Facebook page so millions of other people could enjoy the laugh.

Betty Jean didn’t think it was funny and neither do millions of other women. They rightfully condemn this behavior because they understand it is part of America’s sexist pattern of disrespect, contempt and disregard for women. The same America that laughs when our leading female politicians are routinely called “bitch” on national television. An America where an effigy of Sarah Palin hung from a house is considered a humorous prank and T-Shirts calling her a “cunt” are a source of pride.

Women have a right to psychic and physical boundaries. One sexist act leads to another. Tolerance of abusive language, images and acts are the foundation of sexism. They are the stepping stones to greater abuse in a country that is home to epidemic levels of violence against women. It is behavior like Favreau’s and many other high profile and everyday men and women that continues to nourish the seeds of sexism and misogyny in our country. It is killing us.

Please, let Betty Jean, her daughters and countless other women know that yes:

WE HEAR YOU NOW!

SadStateOfAffairs/Freethinker ©

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hillgrope

OK,  mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.  I left this story percolating for a long time before posting here about it.  By now everyone knows what this picture is about and who is in it.   Part of the reason it hasn’t appeared in this very appropriate blog is because Hillary’s own response to the “affair” was so typically succinct and  pithy that I could never have done better.   But while I let the pot simmer, pressure cookers were exploding all  over Hillaryland.  Here is some of the fallout,  or should I call it “shootout”?

1. Barack Obama should have jumped on this issue. Agreed.  But then,  we should know by now that his modus operandi is to sit tight, do nothing, and hope it all goes away –  that hopey/changey posture.  When the hurricanes were hitting the Gulf this season and Obama was scheduled to appear on SNL, he cancelled his appearance due to a hurricane and hurried home to Chicago and took the weekend off.   That was his chance to high-tail it to the Gulf and fill sandbags with “the folks” as McCain had for the previous hurricane (you remember  – the one when Obama sent you 3 or 4 emails from his Blackberry asking you to donate to the Red Cross – through HIS WEBSITE).  But he did not visit the Gulf that weekend.  He stayed home.  We know this about him,  he lets his chances go by.  The Hillgrope Affair was his chance to make a statement against sexism.  Of course he blew it because uh -uh  he really isn’t against sexism,  aaaaaaannndd um the new SoS is hot.  You can’t blame “the boys,” can you?!

2. Jon Favreau should be fired. Well, if he didn’t do #1, he was not about to do this.  Case closed.

3. It’s not the real Hillary, y’all!  She’s only cardboard! I might mention that it’s a very cute likeness of a very cute Hillary.  One of the many disadvantages of being female is the male misconception that physical attractiveness is the equivalent of an invitation or permission.   But the larger issue is that of symbolism.  To many, the image of Hillary represents Hillary, therefore groping the image approaches molesting the person.  (And we Homegirls are dedicated to protecting her from such invasions.   These Hillary cutouts lack Secret Service Details so the job falls to us.)  If a picture (image, graphic) is worth a thousand words, lets look at a few other image-related incidents.

There’s this: art_noose_gi

Well we all know what THIS means, don’t we?  Anti-noose sentiments were so strong after the Jena, Louisiana incidents that at Halloween this year,  there were serious objections to decorations involving “ghosts” made of sheets hanging from trees.  Now one would think that if there were retribution in this world it might take the form of sheeted figures hanging from nooses, but even these free-form figures of white were somehow considered racist and offensive.

art_palin_gi

Meanwhile in LA (the CA one) we encountered this Halloween “decoration.”

Unlike “ghosts” which cannot be identified as personalities, this figure was highly identifiable.  And I ask you, is she not hanging from a noose?    I heard, and you might have also, that a similar display involving Obama had been erected somewhere else.  I could not find a photo of that probably because it was taken down under public pressure very quickly.  This one was allowed to remain for days “because it’s LA!”  Well, I don’t know.  I think,  even in LA, had it been Obama hanging there I might not have found the picture.   So hang her high! And hang her why? Well, she’s  Republican, and LA is historically Democrat.  She has five kids (at least three of whom have seen this display) – she’s overpopulating the planet – and she’s not pro-choice! Aaaaannnnndddd.  She’s only a woman.  It’s just a joke, folks!  Have a sense of humor.

Well the Jon Favreau Hillarygrope was also supposed to be a joke (actually, I think he’s hot for Hill).  Some jokes are insulting, offensive, and should be self-censored.  Some of us remember the cock-fight joke of Reagan’s that Nancy inadvertently leaked to the press and caused a mild dust-up in the 70’s.   Everybody let it slide.  They still loved Reagan and voted for him nonetheless.    In hindsight, we have seen Solidarnosc, lived through a brilliant and much-loved Polish Pope, and come to feel our families are not that different from that of Tony Soprano (even Bill and Hill identified).

If it were not for thousands of years of subjugation and mistreatment of women in societies and cultures the world over from which some of us had hope our own country might finally be emerging,  I might laugh too and say “How cute!”   But it isn’t cute, Jon.  Not cute, Barack.  Offensive and threatening to many women who in the past week have attested to their own reactions to this photo.  Some of these women were molested in scenes very similar to this.  The picture did not bring happy memories.  I have to agree with them.  Letting this go encourages this behavior by not condemning it.

So I stand with my sisters who say, “Barack, please fire him before he ever attends a staff meeting where Hillary is present.”

As for Hillary, here’s how she handles “bad and evil men” and “men who are obsessed with her.”

Fishslapped!!!  (For you Monty Python fans).

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