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Archive for March, 2016

Still4Hill

 

Hillary Clinton Statement on International Women’s Day

Hillary Clinton released the following statement on International Women’s Day:

“On International Women’s Day, we celebrate women around the world, in all stations of life — mothers, daughters, grandmothers, teachers, doctors, soldiers, artists, workers, employers, leaders of all kinds.  We celebrate their achievements and their humanity.  We celebrate the progress we’ve made to advance the full participation of women in economies and societies.  And most importantly, we recommit to finishing the unfinished work that remains, and ensuring that women and girls are treated as the full and equal human beings they are.

“Advancing the status of women is not just the right thing to do; it’s the smart thing to do.  When women and girls participate fully, economies grow and nations are more secure.  When their rights are denied, the opposite happens. No country can get ahead if half its people are left behind.

“I’ve spent my…

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Still4Hill

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In honor of International Women’s Day, we will be hosting a call tomorrow at 4pm EST to celebrate the achievements of women around the world. We have two very special guests joining us to spotlight Hillary’s record of breaking down barriers for women and girls. Please register for the call here.
Melanne Verveer

Ambassador Verveer is the Executive Director of the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security. She most recently served as the first U.S. Ambassador for Global Women’s Issues, a position to which she was nominated by President Obama in 2009. She coordinated foreign policy issues and  activities relating to the political, economic and social advancement of women, traveling to nearly sixty countries. She worked to ensure that women’s participation and rights are fully integrated into U.S. foreign policy, and she played a leadership role in the Administration’s development of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace and…

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Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, First Lady Michelle Obama & Retired Brigadier General Wilma L. Vaught, U.S. Air Force

Each March, we come together to celebrate Women’s History Month — a time to lift up the legacy of every woman who has stepped forward to expand and defend freedom throughout our history.

In honor of this occasion, it was my privilege this week to be joined by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden to pay tribute to the heroic women who support and defend the American people: America’s women veterans.

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Thank you, Hillary Clinton, for this tweet!

Jeannette Pickering Rankin (June 11, 1880 – May 18, 1973) became the first woman to hold a high government office in the United States when, in 1916, she was elected to the United States Congress from the state of Montana. After winning her House seat in 1916, she said, “I may be the first woman member of Congress but I won’t be the last.” She also was elected in 1940.

Rankin’s two terms in Congress coincided with U.S. entry into both World Wars. A lifelong pacifist, she was one of 56 members of Congress (including 50 in the House) who voted against entry into World War I in 1917, and the only member of Congress to vote against declaring war on Japan after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.

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In February 1911, Rankin became the first woman to speak before the Montana legislature, making her case for women’s suffrage. In November 1914, Montana passed a similar amendment granting women unrestricted voting rights. Rankin later compared her work in the women’s suffrage movement to the pacifist foreign policy that defined her congressional career. She believed, with many suffragists of the period, that the corruption and dysfunction of the United States government was a result of a lack of feminine participation. As she said at a disarmament conference in the interwar period, “The peace problem is a woman’s problem.”

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ON THIS DAY

On March 4, 1933, the start of President Roosevelt’s first administration brought with it the first woman to serve in the cabinet: Labor Secretary Frances Perkins.

Frances Perkins

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Frances Perkins Wilson (born Fannie Coralie Perkins; April 10, 1880[1][2] – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, the longest serving in that position, and the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet. As a loyal supporter of her friend, Franklin D. Roosevelt, she helped pull the labor movement into the New Deal coalition. She and Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes were the only original members of the Roosevelt cabinet to remain in office for his entire presidency.
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Memorials and Monuments

The Frances Perkins Building that is the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, D.C. was named in her honor in 1980.

The Frances Perkins Center is a nonprofit organization located in Damariscotta, Maine. Its mission is to fulfill the legacy of Frances Perkins through educating visitors on her work and programs, and preserving the Perkins family homestead for future generations. The Center regularly hosts events and exhibitions for the public.

Perkins remains a prominent alumna of Mount Holyoke College, whose Frances Perkins Program allows “women of non-traditional age” (i.e., age 24 or older) to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree. There are approximately 140 Frances Perkins scholars each year.

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Women’s Outreach shared this great idea.  Stay tuned!

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Save the Date: March 8th – International Women’s Day
                                                                                   
March 8th is International Women’s Day, and we’re so excited for the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of women around the world.
Hillary Clinton has been a champion for women and girls her entire career. From co-founding the Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families in 1977, to elevating women’s rights as First Lady, Senator and Secretary of State, Clinton has a proven record of fighting for gender equality.
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Join us next Tuesday and stand with women all over the country by hosting a house party in your community. In the coming days, we’ll be sharing digital organizing tools and talking points you can use to spread the word on how Hillary will continue to fight for women as President. We will also be hosting a conference call in the evening with a very special guest who will be joining us to spotlight Hillary’s record.
If you’re interested in hosting a house party, please email womensoutreach@hillaryclinton.com and we’ll follow up with more information!

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This young woman starts the month off exactly right!  She’s reading Living History by Hillary Clinton. We are hoping Hillary gets some big wins by the end of the day.

Linda Leseman reads "Living History," a memoir by Hillary Rodham Clinton, while riding the subway, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in New York. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton enters a series of Super Tuesday contests poised to extend her lead over Democratic rival Bernie Sanders, who risks a major setback for his insurgent campaign with a poor showing in primaries and caucuses across the nation. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Linda Leseman reads “Living History,” a memoir by Hillary Rodham Clinton, while riding the subway, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in New York. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton enters a series of Super Tuesday contests poised to extend her lead over Democratic rival Bernie Sanders, who risks a major setback for his insurgent campaign with a poor showing in primaries and caucuses across the nation. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Linda Leseman reads "Living History," a memoir by Hillary Clinton, while riding the subway, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in New York. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton enters a series of Super Tuesday contests poised to extend her lead over Democratic rival Bernie Sanders, who risks a major setback for his insurgent campaign with a poor showing in primaries and caucuses across the nation. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Linda Leseman reads “Living History,” a memoir by Hillary Clinton, while riding the subway, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in New York. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton enters a series of Super Tuesday contests poised to extend her lead over Democratic rival Bernie Sanders, who risks a major setback for his insurgent campaign with a poor showing in primaries and caucuses across the nation. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

If you live in a Super Tuesday state, you have a great chance to make women’s history today.  Even if you live elsewhere, you can still help and be a part of history.

Here are some things you can do >>>>

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